Destroyer of Light 30

posted March 14th, 2014, 12:32 am


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March 14th, 2014, 1:04 am

agnosis

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There was a harvest festival in ancient Greece called the Thalysia when people offered first fruits to Demeter in thanks for her blessings. The poet Theocritus mentions it in his seventh idyll. Unfortunately it's hard to find that much information about it and people don't even seem to agree upon when it took place. Some say it was in autumn, others that it was in early summer.

Demeter is the goddess of corn. And the Greek peasants harvested corn in spring and threshed it in early summer (at least in the areas with Mediterranean climate). That seems to indicate that the Thalysia was celebrated in early summer. But I think that Theocritus mentions ripe fruits in his idyll and the fruit harvest, if I'm not mistaken, was conducted in autumn. To make things even more confusing he describes Demeter (or a statue of her) holding poppies and sheaves of wheat in her hands. And doesn't the poppy bloom in early summer...?

Anyway, I chose it to be early summer (this may sound like an unimportant detail, but it gave me quite a headache).

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December 11th, 2017, 3:35 am

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March 1st, 2016, 4:56 am

blauerosen (Guest)

do i really have to title these comments

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@agnosis: I don't know if you have looked at the original texts or anything but of course it might not be specific about what type of first fruit was offered to her.

Additionally, I don't know if you're interested, but it is said that corn is very unsuitable for human consumption, and that that's why the Native American societies didn't get ""as far"" as the Europeans and Asians - because they were malnourished.

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March 1st, 2016, 2:29 pm

agnosis

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@blauerosen: I think that "first fruits" in this case means that they sacrificed some of the newly harvested grain to Demeter.

Oh, the word corn refers to grain in this context, not maize. The ancient Greeks didn't grow maize. But, yeah, I think I once read something like that in Guns, Germs and Steel by Jared Diamond.

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